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Electrical Engineering: Automation and the future of work in Southeast Asia

Have you ever wanted to travel to Southeast Asia? Have you ever been interested in taking your students to the region's fastest-growing economies to learn about the latest technologies they are using? Now you have a chance to combine the two in this customized faculty-led program to Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam and Singapore brought to you by ABROADER. 

Request for proposal
  • Participate in a highly engaged study abroad program in South East Asia
  • Enjoy a mixed taste of tradition and modernity beauty of the HCMC
  • Explore urban dynamic life in two of the world’s most dynamic cities through cultural sites and most importantly, having conversations with a variety of local inhabitants such as local buddies, staff and professionals from diverse backgrounds about their work and family lives
  • Visit leading electrical engineering companies and manufacturers as well as observe the systems that they currently deploy
  • Spend an overnight excursion with a traditional homestay in Mekong Delta & take a boat excursion to the Cai Be or Cai Rang floating markets. And, don't miss out opportunities to join workshops introducing the production of rice paper, rice crispy, honey and coconut candy
  • Visit downtown Singapore with a tour to Gardens by the Bay-a state-of-the-art engineering and lush greenery

 

Tentative locations: Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam) & Singapore

Duration: 4 weeks

Tentative program itinerary:

Day 1 - Arrive in Ho Chi Minh City, Hotel check-in, Welcome dinner

Day 2 - Orientation & Basic Vietnamese lesson 

Day 3 - Class day (8 hours)

Day 4 - Industry visits (2 companies)

Day 5 - Class (4 hours) & Volunteer Activity

Day 6 - Industry visits (2 companies)

Day 7 - City tour with local buddies & Cultural Show (No.1 in Vietnam)

Day 8 - Free Day

Day 9 - Class day (8 hours)

Day 10 - Industry visits (2 companies)

Day 11 - Day trip to the Cu Chi Tunnels

Day 12 - Class day (8 hours)

Day 13 & 14: Overnight Mekong Delta Tour

Day 15 - Free day 

Day 16 - Class day (8 hours) 

Day 17 - STEM/EPIC DAY with local students

Day 18 - Class (8 hours), Farewell dinner

Day 19, 20 & 21 - Free days

Day 22 - Hotel check-out, Depart for Singapore 

Day 23 - Free day/Explore Singapore (Gardens by the Bay), Welcome dinner 

Day 24 - Class day (8 hours)

Day 25 - Industry visits (2 companies)

Day 26 - Industry visits (2 companies)

Day 27 - Class day (8 hours)

Day 28 - Free day 

Day 29 - Hotel check-out, Depart from Singapore 

All activities listed above are subject to change in case of unexpected circumstances or companies/organizations' unavailability.

We customize the itinerary to best meet your needs and objectives, thus there will be no programs with the same price. 

What's usually included in our price? 

  • Airport transfer
  • Accommodation: 3-star hotel, twin room, same-gender/room, single room for university faculty, free Wi-Fi and room service
  • Meals: Breakfast at hotel; welcome and farewell dinners; other meals as listed in the itinerary
  • Program development
  • Program coordinator accompanies the group in every activity for the whole program;
  • Local buddies arrangement (if requested) 
  • On-site orientation;
  • Company visits arrangement;
  • Guide and entrance fees for all excursions as listed in the itinerary
  • Transportation as described in the program itinerary
  • 24/7 emergency contact number (SOS card);
  • All gratuities to bus drivers, tour guides and/ or similar;
  • Fee for at least 1 faculty or employee from the university to join in program activities with students in Vietnam.

Step 1: Please take some minutes to fill out this online questionnaireOur Program Manager will then contact you for a free consultation meeting to discuss your customized program in more detail.

Step 2: We finalize and send you the program proposal(s) for your institution’s approval.

Step 3Partnership agreement/Program Contract signed

Step 4: Implementation

Things to do on your end:

  • Market your program on campus & process students’ applications
  • Approve and finalize academic content for the program
  • Work closely with ABROADER's Program Manager to finalize all activities and logistics needed for your program (airfare, housing, airport pickup, classroom, excursions, etc.)
  • Collect students’ program fees
  • Hold pre-departure meeting and orientation


*If you feel overwhelmed, please rest assured that we are always here to support any of the things you are supposed to do at this step.


Things we do on our end:

  • Finalize the overall program schedule
  • Produce or support the production of marketing materials for your program
  • Arrange all necessary logistics, site visits and cultural excursions for your program
  • Provide support for the pre-departure meeting and orientation 

Step 5: Your program starts - you and your students arrive in Vietnam or another program location in Southeast Asia.

Step 6: While in the program location, you teach the course, we take care of all the other activities and logistics for your program.

Step 7: Your program ends – the group departs from the program location.  After you return home, there will be an evaluation meeting for us to review your program for future improvements and planning. 


We endeavour to guarantee that through every stage of our process, issues like power and privilege, diversity and inclusion, community voice and reciprocity are taken into full consideration to make sure that every stakeholder is heard and included.

During my environmental engineering internship at my host company, I have learned a great deal of practical knowledge and skills that I hadn’t been taught in schools before, in particular my design skills have been improved a lot. My supervisor and coworkers gave me very helpful support and guidance which is what I expected to have in an internship, although I wish I was more freedom to explore and do independent work. Adding to the experience, I got to go on a field trip to Hai Duong in 2 weeks while I was an intern. It was a valuable experience for me because I was able to travel and see the different practices in a smaller city of Hai Duong compared to Hanoi, I of course made new friends and had a little peak into the local life of people outside the busy capital.

Geogre Wilson

Environmental Engineering Internship ,Durham University, England

The experience of doing an internship in Vietnam certainly was not easy for me but I have no doubt that it was tremendouly valuable. At first, I actually had a lot of culture shocks, for example, sometimes it was hard to communicate with Vietnamese people because not a lot of people speak English and some had very strong accent. However, Vietnamese people were very kind to me and took well care of me especially the host family and program coordinator. I realized that it’s difficult to understand another culture but it’s also really necessary to accept other culture, their life and their way of thinking. At the hotel where I did my internship, I could learn a lot of things. For example, I learnt how to communicate politely with customers, how to make them satisfied and how to manage the hotel. Everyone from the supervisor to my co-workers was helpful and accommodating, I was included in all the daily meetings and the supervisor was very open to share her knowledge about hotel management which was really helpful to my future work. I really had a good experience in Vietnam. I appreciate the people I’ve met and the experience I’ve had. This is going to be very useful in the future. Thank you ABROADER Vietnam so much for the valuable opportunity to learn about my field of work in your beautiful country!

Kaoru Mori

Hospitality Internship ,Nagoya University of Foreign Studies, Japan

Overall the people have exceeded my expectations, and they are really what’s going to help make my experience in Vietnam a great one. I’ve always loved leaving my country (the US) and having new experience, so I wanted to do an internship abroad. Having already spent a semester in Europe, I wanted something really different. My mom was born in Saigon and lived there before coming to the United States with her family. So I felt like a good way to get in touch with my culture and my roots would be to spend three months living and working in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. In my internship in Vietnam, I have helped with various marketing efforts by giving ideas or designing things. I have learned that, of course, there is a different way of doing business here compared to the United States. Things are run differently, there’s a different office culture, there are just always many cultural differences to keep in mind when doing business in a different country, and Vietnam has not been an exception. The people ABROADER have set me up with have been beyond wonderful. Coming to Vietnam on my own seemed very daunting and intimidating, but ABROADER has helped make the transition smooth and seamless. They helped take care of everything I would need during my time here and have gone above and beyond to assure that things continue to go smoothly. I am very appreciative of their support, and it makes the whole thing a little less scary. My local buddies have been so helpful for everything, and I really feel like they are becoming genuine friends. I am generally pretty shy, so it was nice to have friends before even arriving to help introduce me to more people and get me out there. Overall the people have exceeded my expectations, and they are really what’s going to help make my experience in Vietnam a great one.

Natasha Nguyen Mohney

Marketing Internship ,Indiana University, Bloomington, USA

I have always been an extremely shy person, when I was small, my face would turn red and I even cried in front of people. Now that I’m a grown up, I want to become more confident, make friends and talk with them like other people do after one-month internship here in Vietnam.

Miho Matsui

Education Internship ,Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University, Japan

The three weeks that I spent in Vietnam gave me a unique insight and greater appreciation into the world around me. Going to Vietnam has made me value the things I take for granted in Australia, such as just being able to drink clean water from the tap. I discovered that the people of Vietnam are so generous and forgiving. I made many new friends during the study tour and learned a course all whilst touring a great country. The study tour was very enjoyable and I had lots of fun along the way with the activities planned by the local buddies. The course itself was interesting and I genuinely enjoyed the content, despite it being so condensed into a few weeks. My advice for students wanting to go on ABROADER study tour would be to just enjoy the trip while it lasts and take as many photos as possible, because the time goes so quick. A huge thank you to all the organisers of the trip and to the local buddies for making this trip possible and the best it could have been.

Dante Staneke

Electrical Engineering & Computing Study Tour ,University of Newcastle, Australia

Being in Vietnam is the best experience in my life so far!!! I cannot believe 6 weeks have actually gone by. I love my internship at Siten. People in the company are really helpful and understanding. They are like a family. Like when I was sick and asked for a morning off, they told me to stay at home for the afternoon so that I can truly feel better. My Thuan – my supervisor has taught me so much. He actually encouraged me to go explore Vietnam – so different from other leaders I know. He let me do what I want to do. The largest problem was the language barrier but we managed to communicate with each other quite well. They said I inspire them to learn English. So yeah, everything is pretty perfect. The best experience in my life so far! At Siten I worked on a project for learning English in which I helped develop the website and prototyped games. The staff also me HTML which I really enjoyed learning. Besides going to work, I spent all of my weekend travel to new places like Sapa, Hoian, Danang, Ha Long Bay. I met with so many nice people who are so friendly and they really want you to immerse into the culture. If there is one thing I feel that I have grown, it must be my ability to talk with people, to be more open towards anything. Before coming here I knew pretty much nothing about Vietnam. Still I managed to live here and was actually never lonely my whole time being in Vietnam. I am glad that I came here. I cannot believe I am gonna leave this place so soon. Thank you all so much!

Zareen Fazleabas

IT Internship ,Pennsylvania State University, USA

Prior to arriving in Vietnam, I had never had a so-called “life-changing” experience. There is no guidebook on how to achieve one, nor was I able to grasp such a concept, moments so strong as to change the path for your life. That is until I went to Vietnam. There is so much more than meets the eye in the beautiful country of Vietnam. A tourist or temporary visitor may only be granted with picturesque views of rice fields and the women in their hats, the mountains of the north, or a steaming bowl of Pho placed on their plastic red table. And while these experiences are all incredible in their own right, there is so much more to discover, whether it be the story of the people under the hats, the sellers on the streets, or the history of the land that you have the opportunity to travel. ABROADER Vietnam granted me the opportunity to uncover such stories, and an internship with memories that has left me longing to go back since the moment I returned home. Vietnam has become my second home. Granted, I had gotten the opportunity to travel and become accustomed to Vietnam for about four months prior to starting the internship. My University had allowed me to study abroad during which time I adjusted to the food and language, learning about almost every aspect of Vietnam culture. But this was only a preview of what was to come. My time with the internship let me interact with the people, practice my Vietnamese, take trips with my coworkers, and uncover passions for things I didn’t know existed. I have too many incredible stories to be able to write them all throughout this review, and so I’ll pick a few of the mostly little interactions that really meant the most. ABROADER Vietnam set me up in a homestay, perhaps one of the highlights of my journey, and I can say with complete honesty that I felt like part of the family. There was a cook by the name of “Vui”, meaning happy in Vietnamese, and how appropriate as she radiated happiness onto me throughout my entire stay. She did not speak any English, but somehow I was able to coordinate trips to the market, request my favorite food for dinners, and convey to her how much I loved her country. She bought me 21 roses on my 21st birthday, only proving her kindness. The mother of the household, unlike Vui, spoke some English. She often taught me Vietnamese when I had free time, as well as took me to the market, and made me feel extremely welcome when I felt the slightest bit homesick. But as for the internship itself, I was placed in two hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, one directly in the center, and one located more on the outskirts. I’m not going to lie and say that there were no challenges. Originally people were confused to why I was there, I got lost several times, and some days I had no one to teach me, but those were a minuscule few days as most, out of a ten week internship. I made friends with the doctors who taught me about topics from infectious diseases in Vietnam, to the catheder lab, and even more in the surgical urology department.. We frequently went out to eat, where we exchanged stories, and I answered curious questions about my time in Vietnam thus far. Other friends I made were medical students, originally too shy to approach me, but through my time in the hospital gathered up the courage to speak to me. I served to help them practice their English and was happy about it as I know how many opportunities it can open up for them. They invited me for bubble tea, food, and even once to a Vietnamese fruit farm, two hours by train. I was gifted the opportunity to dress up in the MOST attractive brown cloth attire, and proceed to pick and eat as much fruit as humanly possible on perhaps one of the most humid days. While I felt almost at home, eating to my hearts desire, I most certainly looked out of place with the brown pants acting more like a short capri on my long legs. It was days like this that I got to thinking of how grateful I was for the opportunity to stay in Vietnam for a little bit longer. I learned lots about my friends, and one of my favorite aspects of their culture is how open they are to strangers; how they just immediately let them in to their personal lives, and are completely honest. It is something that I miss the most. And lastly, as I don’t want to write a novel here, I have to talk about my experiences with the nurses at the second hospital that I worked in. The first week as usual was slightly stressful with not much sense of direction, but I quickly made friends, and their generosity was incredible. My days consisted of learning from doctors for a few hours, walking from room to room, checking patients vitals, or just practicing Vietnamese. But as soon as I took a break in the nurses “lounge”, I was bombarded with different Vietnamese foods coming my way. Each nurse wanted to share with me a piece of their dish, and talk to me as much as they could. Each morning from there on I would be asked in Vietnamese “Ali an sang chua?”, a phrase meaning “have you eaten breakfast yet?” Per usual I had not, and my answer encouraged them to start making me a coffee, and once again piling different foods in my bowls and encouraging me to eat mysterious shaped foods. My response that the food was delicious, or “ngon”, only encouraged them more. This routine continued until the end of my internship. The goodbyes were not easy, and there were many I had to make. Each attempted goodbye always ended with another attempt by them to try and meet up once more, at which I sullenly had to refuse. There are only a few things I will say to end this review that went much too long. These moments that I experienced were granted to me due to my opportunity to take up an internship with ABROADER, who set me up in the select hospitals, with my host family, and opened the doors for me to make connections. And of course when you take on an internship you have to do your part. You must be open, able to laugh when things don’t go your way, and not let any roadblock deter you. Looking back I know that I have changed. While I couldn’t see it in the moment, the internship boosted my confidence and improved my relationship with failure. It also made my more open with myself and those that I met. I wished my internship could go longer, and perhaps I will find a job in Vietnam one day, so for now all I can do is reminisce through reviews about the most life-changing time I had with my internship and with ABROADER.

Alison Burelbach

Medical Internship ,Loyola University Chicago, USA

I realize that the key to develop yourself is to improve your competence in a whole new environment, and coming to Vietnam for an internship accomplished what I came for. I came here because I wanted to have more confidence to speak up my mind in front of other people and it is hard to accomplish these when you are still in your comfort zone.

Takahisa Morino

Education Internship ,Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University, Japan

I had a blast with the remote internship with ABROADER. The cultural sessions were exciting and informative of the way of life in Vietnam. What made this unique for me was the staffs engagement with me and the other students. I liked getting to talk about the differences in cultures and similarities. The staff was always excited to see me and liked talking about my interests as well. I really liked the food cultural sessions and the opportunity to make Vietnamese food in my own home. I think any future participant would like this program if they wanted something outside their comfort zone. It was an entirely different world from the US to Vietnam and I enjoyed every second of it. What was your funniest moment? The funniest moment was when I was caught laughing at a video during a cultural meeting. The video was a music video and had hilarious content and I got called out because the host of the meeting saw me laughing. I thought this was not just funny because the video but also because the hosts were glad I was enjoying the cultural session.

Marshall Keller

Business Assistant Remote Internship ,Princeton University

I am thankful to God that my daughter had an opportunity to be in Vietnam for 3 months through ABROADER. She stayed with a host family for a month and half and was able to learn a lot about the culture and the food. She loved her host family and misses them. Then she had traveled to Hanoi and worked with ABROADER. The staff was very friendly, caring, and hospitable. After 3 months in Vietnam, I had noticed the changes in my daughter about her outlook of life. She is no longer as much of a picky eater and her compassion and understanding of the Vietnamese people, the culture, and the food has greatly increased. I believe that this experience has helped her grow fast in her journey of life. Thanks ABROADER!!

Maryann Mohney

Marketing Internship ,Natasha Mohney’s mother