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Food & Tourism Industry in Vietnam

This unique 10-day program will give your students an opportunity to learn the secrets behind the famous Vietnamese cuisine, understand tourism as an element of Vietnam's economy and what it's like to do business in Vietnam

Request for proposal
  • A highly locally-engaged and historically rich study tour in Vietnam
  • An ALL-LOCAL-FOODS program
  • Tradition and modernity experienced at the same time
  • Excursion to the Mekong Delta, water exploration of  villages and boat excursion to the Cai Be or Cai Rang floating markets and opportunity for a walking exploration of little workshops for the production of rice paper, rice crispy, and honey and coconut candy

Tentative location: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Duration: 10 days

Tentative Program Itinerary:

Day 1: Arrival in HCMC & Welcome Dinner

Morning/Afternoon: airport pick up, hotel check-in

Official check-in time is 14:00

Evening: Welcome Dinner

Day 2: Orientation - Cooking Class 

Morning: Free to rest

Afternoon: Onsite Orientation

Students will have an orientation with the site team. Background on Vietnam, Program itinerary, safety, and survival tips and a basic Vietnamese language lesson will be covered.

Evening: Cooking Class

Day 3: Industry visit 1 - Cooking Class - Guest Lecture

Morning: Industry visit

Afternoon: Guest lecture: “Doing Business in Vietnam”

Evening: Cooking class 

Day 4: HCM City & Markets Tour

Morning: Markets (including both traditional wet markets and supermarkets) tour to learn about ingredient sourcing

Afternoon: City tour

Day 5:  Day trip to the  Mekong Delta

Theme of tour: Sustainable tourism

A trip for students to see the biggest “rice bowl” of Vietnam, the main drive behind Vietnam being the 3rd rice exporter in the world at the same time experience life in a water world where boats, houses and markets float upon innumerable rivers, canals and streams. The Mekong Delta is also home to many of Vietnam’s most delicious dishes.

Day 6: Free Morning - Cooking Class - Guest Lecture

Morning: Free

Noon & Afternoon: Guest lecture: “Social entrepreneurship in Vietnam”

Evening: Cooking class

Day 7: Industry visit 2 - Cooking Class - Guest Lecture

Morning: Industry visit

Afternoon: Guest lecture - “Tourism as an element of Vietnam’s economy" 

Evening: Cooking class

Day 8: Industry visit 3 - Cooking Class - Guest Lecture

Morning: Industry visit 3

Afternoon: Guest lecture - “Food Policy & Nutrition

Evening: Cooking Class

Day 9:  Expat district Tour - Farewell Dinner

Morning: District 2 (also known as Expat District) tour to learn about the life of international communities in Ho Chi Minh City

Afternoon: Free

Evening: Farewell Dinner

Day 10: Departure from Vietnam

Morning/Noon: Check out of hotel

Afternoon/Evening: Departure from Ho Chi Minh City, End of program


All activities listed above are subject to change in case of unexpected circumstances or companies/organizations' unavailability.

We customize the itinerary to best meet your needs and objectives, thus there will be no programs with the same price. 

What's usually included in our price? 

  • Airport transfer
  • Accommodation: 3-star hotel, twin room, same-gender/room, single room for university faculty, free Wi-Fi and room service
  • Meals: Breakfast at hotel; welcome and farewell dinners; other meals as listed in the itinerary
  • Program development
  • Program coordinator accompanies the group in every activity for the whole program;
  • Local buddies arrangement (if requested) 
  • On-site orientation;
  • Company visits arrangement;
  • Guide and entrance fees for all excursions as listed in the itinerary
  • Transportation as described in the program itinerary
  • 24/7 emergency contact number (SOS card);
  • All gratuities to bus drivers, tour guides and/ or similar;
  • Fee for at least 1 faculty or employee from the university to join in program activities with students in Vietnam.

Step 1: Please take some minutes to fill out this online questionnaire. Our Program Manager will then contact you for a free consultation meeting to discuss your customized program in more detail.

Step 2: We finalize and send you the program proposal(s) for your institution’s approval.

Step 3: Partnership agreement/Program Contract signed

Step 4: Implementation

Things to do on your end:

  • Market your program on campus and process students’ applications
  • Approve and finalize academic content for the program
  • Work closely with ABROADER's Program Manager to finalize all activities and logistics needed for your program (airfare, housing, airport pickup, classroom, excursions, site visits, etc.)
  • Collect students’ program fees
  • Hold pre-departure meeting and orientation


* If you feel overwhelmed, please rest assured that we are always here to support any of the things you are supposed to do at this step.


Thing we do on our end:

  • Finalize the overall program schedule
  • Produce or support  the production of marketing materials for your program
  • Arrange all necessary logistics, site visits and cultural excursions for  your program
  • Provide support for the pre-departure meeting and orientation


Step 5
: Your program starts - you and your students arrive in Vietnam or another program location in Southeast Asia. 

Step 6: While in the program location, you teach the course, we take care of all the other activities and logistics for your program. 

Step 7: Your program ends – the group departs from the program location.  After you return home, there will be an evaluation meeting for us to review your program for future improvements and planning.


We endeavour to guarantee that through every stage of our process, issues like power and privilege, diversity and inclusion, community voice and reciprocity are taken into full consideration to make sure that every stakeholder is heard and included.

During my environmental engineering internship at my host company, I have learned a great deal of practical knowledge and skills that I hadn’t been taught in schools before, in particular my design skills have been improved a lot. My supervisor and coworkers gave me very helpful support and guidance which is what I expected to have in an internship, although I wish I was more freedom to explore and do independent work. Adding to the experience, I got to go on a field trip to Hai Duong in 2 weeks while I was an intern. It was a valuable experience for me because I was able to travel and see the different practices in a smaller city of Hai Duong compared to Hanoi, I of course made new friends and had a little peak into the local life of people outside the busy capital.

Geogre Wilson

Environmental Engineering Internship ,Durham University, England

It has been awesome trip and experience for me. Thanks for the people that have provided help and support throughout the trip. during my 5 months here, i get to learn this country's culture, people, food and the work life. Comparing Vietnam and Singapore, it is a new experience for me and the other students too. So, if you get the chance to come here and learn/experience, go out and explore. Be adventurous, daring to try out new things/stuff. making friends with the local, explore different part of the city or maybe even traveling out of the city. It is worth to spend your time to the fullest here!! “Don’t travel just to see. Travel to try, listen, feel, taste. That way there won’t be any place you cannot find beauty.”

Xiong Binsong

IT Internship ,Republic Polytechnic, Singapore

For starters, having gone into this with the full expectation of entering a foreign country for the sole purpose of working, I am thoroughly surprised by the amount of affection and care given through each and every step in more aspects than just work. When people hear the term agency they expect a common, lackadaisical, professional agency that only assists you for queries and links you to your job, but otherwise expresses a rather hands-off approach when it comes to the external factors, such as the things to do on your free time or the places to visit, etc. Maybe I am alone in this thought but through my 5 months internship, ABROADER has given me the opposite of my expectations during the process. Anything wrong with the experience and they're there, anytime you have inquiries they're right at your doorstep, anytime you need a recommendation for a place to cut your hair you got it. They've given me more care, more concern and more assistance in this trip than I can ever ask for, and also an opportunity, not just in a work aspect but in other ways like the opportunity to make friends, an opportunity to explore Vietnam not for what it seems but for what it is, together. Sure, while it is like this it is still a professional establishment, but, what makes them unique and above the rest is that they remember to also keep it personal. It's been a privilege to experience Vietnam with ABROADER and I extend my gratitude. I think the only advice I can give to people coming on this trip is to have an open-mind and to enjoy the process because time passes way too fast if you don't take the time to enjoy the moment.

Adriel Peng Guo Jun

Biology & Environment Internship ,Republic Polytechnic, Singapore

The study tour was a fantastic program full of cultural and fun experiences in both Vietnam and Singapore. Before the trip both of these places had been on my travel list, so when the opportunity for this trip came up I couldn't say no and I'm so glad that I did it. The buddies, the people I travelled with and the organisers made the trip even better. Industries in both countries were super helpful and our visits to these factories was one of the highlights. Networking with these companies, the food, cultural exposure, the people and the organisers made it a beautiful way to study our university course!! The most unfamiliar food that I tried was definitely chicken feet! Sugar cane drinks were also unusual but they tasted awesome! Thank you!!!!

Jared Haysman

Electrical Engineering and Computing Study Tour ,University of Newcastle, Australia

The most satisfying aspect about my internship in Vietnam was my local buddy and my host family. They have always been very nice and inviting during my stay there. My host organization in Vietnam was a local school that provides courses and after-school activities to children with special needs. My co-workers were very generous with inviting me to after work activities or even a couple of days in Sa Pa. My supervisor cared about me both professionally and as a person. I hope that my work at the host organization helped the teachers with my insights working with children with special needs. I also hope to have opened the eyes of the students I worked with that there are people out there who understand their needs and can help them overcome their difficulties in their lives.

Sabrina Zottoli

Social Work and Community Development Internship ,Molloy College, USA

My experience was very unique in the sense that it was first virtual internship. I was not expecting to have one so I was little sad at first but in the end it was really fun and educational experience. Even though it was virtual, I was engaging with local buddies at Vietnam all the time as if we were friends for the longest time and learning and talking about Vietnamese culture every week. We also had some good events amongst ourselves which I will cherish for a long time. The company I worked at was also great. The supervisor was helpful and communicative for the most time. I learned so much working wise also. What was the most surprising thing you saw or did? Singing happy birthday song in Vietnam was definitely one of things I was not expecting to do!

Jae Joon

Business Assistant Remote Internship ,Princeton University

It was an overall enjoyable experience having my internship done through ABROADER Vietnam. The host company that they connected me with has been welcoming, friendly, I have been able to experience a lot of different elements of the company’s culture, helping different people and learning new things about not only the company but also working in general. I felt that I contributed to the host company and my particular help with the MWRP (checking English) was of great importance to them as the deadline approached. They have given me feedback and said that some of my research into potential donors and other youth initiatives in climate change adaptation has been of use to them too. Regarding ABROADER Vietnam intern service was my placement and the amazing support from local staff and volunteer in Hanoi. Would I recommend the internship to anyone interested, definitely!

Maarten Van Balen

Environmental Engineering Internship ,University of Edinburgh, Scotland

I had a blast with the remote internship with ABROADER. The cultural sessions were exciting and informative of the way of life in Vietnam. What made this unique for me was the staffs engagement with me and the other students. I liked getting to talk about the differences in cultures and similarities. The staff was always excited to see me and liked talking about my interests as well. I really liked the food cultural sessions and the opportunity to make Vietnamese food in my own home. I think any future participant would like this program if they wanted something outside their comfort zone. It was an entirely different world from the US to Vietnam and I enjoyed every second of it. What was your funniest moment? The funniest moment was when I was caught laughing at a video during a cultural meeting. The video was a music video and had hilarious content and I got called out because the host of the meeting saw me laughing. I thought this was not just funny because the video but also because the hosts were glad I was enjoying the cultural session.

Marshall Keller

Business Assistant Remote Internship ,Princeton University

Overall we would say it was very positive. The immediate feedback and replies especially when she first arrived were so appreciated. I loved the Facebook posts and it made us feel a little closer to the experience there, especially when Monica was in the village and her internet was sporadic. Of course the village experience was exactly what Monica was hoping for, experience with children in another culture, living with a host family and having the support of mentors and people taking care of her, including taking her to the school each day. The excursion adventures were also amazing experiences for her and she was eager to participate in as much of exploring the Vietnamese countryside and culture as she could in her limited time.

Linda Zang

Education Internship ,Monica Anderson’s mother, USA

Prior to arriving in Vietnam, I had never had a so-called “life-changing” experience. There is no guidebook on how to achieve one, nor was I able to grasp such a concept, moments so strong as to change the path for your life. That is until I went to Vietnam. There is so much more than meets the eye in the beautiful country of Vietnam. A tourist or temporary visitor may only be granted with picturesque views of rice fields and the women in their hats, the mountains of the north, or a steaming bowl of Pho placed on their plastic red table. And while these experiences are all incredible in their own right, there is so much more to discover, whether it be the story of the people under the hats, the sellers on the streets, or the history of the land that you have the opportunity to travel. ABROADER Vietnam granted me the opportunity to uncover such stories, and an internship with memories that has left me longing to go back since the moment I returned home. Vietnam has become my second home. Granted, I had gotten the opportunity to travel and become accustomed to Vietnam for about four months prior to starting the internship. My University had allowed me to study abroad during which time I adjusted to the food and language, learning about almost every aspect of Vietnam culture. But this was only a preview of what was to come. My time with the internship let me interact with the people, practice my Vietnamese, take trips with my coworkers, and uncover passions for things I didn’t know existed. I have too many incredible stories to be able to write them all throughout this review, and so I’ll pick a few of the mostly little interactions that really meant the most. ABROADER Vietnam set me up in a homestay, perhaps one of the highlights of my journey, and I can say with complete honesty that I felt like part of the family. There was a cook by the name of “Vui”, meaning happy in Vietnamese, and how appropriate as she radiated happiness onto me throughout my entire stay. She did not speak any English, but somehow I was able to coordinate trips to the market, request my favorite food for dinners, and convey to her how much I loved her country. She bought me 21 roses on my 21st birthday, only proving her kindness. The mother of the household, unlike Vui, spoke some English. She often taught me Vietnamese when I had free time, as well as took me to the market, and made me feel extremely welcome when I felt the slightest bit homesick. But as for the internship itself, I was placed in two hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, one directly in the center, and one located more on the outskirts. I’m not going to lie and say that there were no challenges. Originally people were confused to why I was there, I got lost several times, and some days I had no one to teach me, but those were a minuscule few days as most, out of a ten week internship. I made friends with the doctors who taught me about topics from infectious diseases in Vietnam, to the catheder lab, and even more in the surgical urology department.. We frequently went out to eat, where we exchanged stories, and I answered curious questions about my time in Vietnam thus far. Other friends I made were medical students, originally too shy to approach me, but through my time in the hospital gathered up the courage to speak to me. I served to help them practice their English and was happy about it as I know how many opportunities it can open up for them. They invited me for bubble tea, food, and even once to a Vietnamese fruit farm, two hours by train. I was gifted the opportunity to dress up in the MOST attractive brown cloth attire, and proceed to pick and eat as much fruit as humanly possible on perhaps one of the most humid days. While I felt almost at home, eating to my hearts desire, I most certainly looked out of place with the brown pants acting more like a short capri on my long legs. It was days like this that I got to thinking of how grateful I was for the opportunity to stay in Vietnam for a little bit longer. I learned lots about my friends, and one of my favorite aspects of their culture is how open they are to strangers; how they just immediately let them in to their personal lives, and are completely honest. It is something that I miss the most. And lastly, as I don’t want to write a novel here, I have to talk about my experiences with the nurses at the second hospital that I worked in. The first week as usual was slightly stressful with not much sense of direction, but I quickly made friends, and their generosity was incredible. My days consisted of learning from doctors for a few hours, walking from room to room, checking patients vitals, or just practicing Vietnamese. But as soon as I took a break in the nurses “lounge”, I was bombarded with different Vietnamese foods coming my way. Each nurse wanted to share with me a piece of their dish, and talk to me as much as they could. Each morning from there on I would be asked in Vietnamese “Ali an sang chua?”, a phrase meaning “have you eaten breakfast yet?” Per usual I had not, and my answer encouraged them to start making me a coffee, and once again piling different foods in my bowls and encouraging me to eat mysterious shaped foods. My response that the food was delicious, or “ngon”, only encouraged them more. This routine continued until the end of my internship. The goodbyes were not easy, and there were many I had to make. Each attempted goodbye always ended with another attempt by them to try and meet up once more, at which I sullenly had to refuse. There are only a few things I will say to end this review that went much too long. These moments that I experienced were granted to me due to my opportunity to take up an internship with ABROADER, who set me up in the select hospitals, with my host family, and opened the doors for me to make connections. And of course when you take on an internship you have to do your part. You must be open, able to laugh when things don’t go your way, and not let any roadblock deter you. Looking back I know that I have changed. While I couldn’t see it in the moment, the internship boosted my confidence and improved my relationship with failure. It also made my more open with myself and those that I met. I wished my internship could go longer, and perhaps I will find a job in Vietnam one day, so for now all I can do is reminisce through reviews about the most life-changing time I had with my internship and with ABROADER.

Alison Burelbach

Medical Internship ,Loyola University Chicago, USA