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Cost of Living

Cost of Living

Apart from our program fees that help you get settled in Vietnam, it is suggested that you always carry a certain amount of pocket money so as to survive here during the time of your program.

In most cases, how much you will spend depends mostly on what you want to purchase or the services you want to use; however, in general the cost of living in Vietnam is around 50% lower than in the US.

Do you believe with just $700 USD/month you will have basically everything you need for your new life abroad, from housing, food, transportation to leisure activities???

The following tables reveal the reasons why you can make it happen in Vietnam:

A. ACCOMMODATION

By accommodation, we mean a safe and private room which usually consists of the following conditions and is a great shelter for your new life in Vietnam. It is not a place for you to just sleep, but truly your second home in the world.

You can check out further details and pictures of the different types of rooms you can choose for your stay in Vietnam HERE.

B. TRANSPORTATION

Once you are in Vietnam, our program coordinator and local buddies will guide you to use some of the most popular means of transportation in the country with which you can easily commute to work and travel around by yourself. Fare for each of them is shown as below:

Transportation within city Fare Note
Taxi 12000-15000VND/km (~1 USD/km) Grab Taxi available
Motor-Taxi 12000VND/km Not recommended for safety reasons
City bus 7000VND/km
City bus pass 200000/pass/month (~11USD/month)
Electric bike renting 120000-150000VND/day (~6USD)
You want more tips on transportation in Vietname? Click HERE!

C. FOOD & DRINKS

Even though it mostly depends on what you want to order and whether you want to go out or eat at home, a meal in Vietnam will usually cost you from $ 2 to $ 5 US dollars only. Below are some of the most famous things to eat and drink in Vietnam, you might want to take them as a reference then:

Food & Drinks Cost
Pho (hot noodle soup) 1.5 USD - 2.5 USD
Bun Cha (noodles with grilled pork) 2.5 USD
Banh Cuon (Rice rolls) 2.5 USD
Bun nem (noodles with spring roll) 2.5 USD
A set of steamed rice 3 USD
A cup of coffee 1 USD
A cup of mixed fruits  1.5 USD
A bottle of water ~1 USD
For starters, having gone into this with the full expectation of entering a foreign country for the sole purpose of working, I am thoroughly surprised by the amount of affection and care given through each and every step in more aspects than just work. When people hear the term agency they expect a common, lackadaisical, professional agency that only assists you for queries and links you to your job, but otherwise expresses a rather hands-off approach when it comes to the external factors, such as the things to do on your free time or the places to visit, etc. Maybe I am alone in this thought but through my 5 months internship, ABROADER has given me the opposite of my expectations during the process. Anything wrong with the experience and they're there, anytime you have inquiries they're right at your doorstep, anytime you need a recommendation for a place to cut your hair you got it. They've given me more care, more concern and more assistance in this trip than I can ever ask for, and also an opportunity, not just in a work aspect but in other ways like the opportunity to make friends, an opportunity to explore Vietnam not for what it seems but for what it is, together. Sure, while it is like this it is still a professional establishment, but, what makes them unique and above the rest is that they remember to also keep it personal. It's been a privilege to experience Vietnam with ABROADER and I extend my gratitude. I think the only advice I can give to people coming on this trip is to have an open-mind and to enjoy the process because time passes way too fast if you don't take the time to enjoy the moment.

Adriel Peng Guo Jun

Biology & Environment Internship ,Republic Polytechnic, Singapore

Being in Vietnam is the best experience in my life so far!!! I cannot believe 6 weeks have actually gone by. I love my internship at Siten. People in the company are really helpful and understanding. They are like a family. Like when I was sick and asked for a morning off, they told me to stay at home for the afternoon so that I can truly feel better. My Thuan – my supervisor has taught me so much. He actually encouraged me to go explore Vietnam – so different from other leaders I know. He let me do what I want to do. The largest problem was the language barrier but we managed to communicate with each other quite well. They said I inspire them to learn English. So yeah, everything is pretty perfect. The best experience in my life so far! At Siten I worked on a project for learning English in which I helped develop the website and prototyped games. The staff also me HTML which I really enjoyed learning. Besides going to work, I spent all of my weekend travel to new places like Sapa, Hoian, Danang, Ha Long Bay. I met with so many nice people who are so friendly and they really want you to immerse into the culture. If there is one thing I feel that I have grown, it must be my ability to talk with people, to be more open towards anything. Before coming here I knew pretty much nothing about Vietnam. Still I managed to live here and was actually never lonely my whole time being in Vietnam. I am glad that I came here. I cannot believe I am gonna leave this place so soon. Thank you all so much!

Zareen Fazleabas

IT Internship ,Pennsylvania State University, USA

The best thing about ABROADER Vietnam was being able to plan events with other interns and with local buddy. I depended on these events to originally get out of my shell in Vietnam while I was adjusting to the new language and culture. Especially with being able to offer perspective on Vietnamese culture with schooling, media/entertainment, government, and with great local attractions in Ho Chi Minh.

Patrick West

Environment Internship ,University of Notre Dame, USA

Prior to arriving in Vietnam, I had never had a so-called “life-changing” experience. There is no guidebook on how to achieve one, nor was I able to grasp such a concept, moments so strong as to change the path for your life. That is until I went to Vietnam. There is so much more than meets the eye in the beautiful country of Vietnam. A tourist or temporary visitor may only be granted with picturesque views of rice fields and the women in their hats, the mountains of the north, or a steaming bowl of Pho placed on their plastic red table. And while these experiences are all incredible in their own right, there is so much more to discover, whether it be the story of the people under the hats, the sellers on the streets, or the history of the land that you have the opportunity to travel. ABROADER Vietnam granted me the opportunity to uncover such stories, and an internship with memories that has left me longing to go back since the moment I returned home. Vietnam has become my second home. Granted, I had gotten the opportunity to travel and become accustomed to Vietnam for about four months prior to starting the internship. My University had allowed me to study abroad during which time I adjusted to the food and language, learning about almost every aspect of Vietnam culture. But this was only a preview of what was to come. My time with the internship let me interact with the people, practice my Vietnamese, take trips with my coworkers, and uncover passions for things I didn’t know existed. I have too many incredible stories to be able to write them all throughout this review, and so I’ll pick a few of the mostly little interactions that really meant the most. ABROADER Vietnam set me up in a homestay, perhaps one of the highlights of my journey, and I can say with complete honesty that I felt like part of the family. There was a cook by the name of “Vui”, meaning happy in Vietnamese, and how appropriate as she radiated happiness onto me throughout my entire stay. She did not speak any English, but somehow I was able to coordinate trips to the market, request my favorite food for dinners, and convey to her how much I loved her country. She bought me 21 roses on my 21st birthday, only proving her kindness. The mother of the household, unlike Vui, spoke some English. She often taught me Vietnamese when I had free time, as well as took me to the market, and made me feel extremely welcome when I felt the slightest bit homesick. But as for the internship itself, I was placed in two hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, one directly in the center, and one located more on the outskirts. I’m not going to lie and say that there were no challenges. Originally people were confused to why I was there, I got lost several times, and some days I had no one to teach me, but those were a minuscule few days as most, out of a ten week internship. I made friends with the doctors who taught me about topics from infectious diseases in Vietnam, to the catheder lab, and even more in the surgical urology department.. We frequently went out to eat, where we exchanged stories, and I answered curious questions about my time in Vietnam thus far. Other friends I made were medical students, originally too shy to approach me, but through my time in the hospital gathered up the courage to speak to me. I served to help them practice their English and was happy about it as I know how many opportunities it can open up for them. They invited me for bubble tea, food, and even once to a Vietnamese fruit farm, two hours by train. I was gifted the opportunity to dress up in the MOST attractive brown cloth attire, and proceed to pick and eat as much fruit as humanly possible on perhaps one of the most humid days. While I felt almost at home, eating to my hearts desire, I most certainly looked out of place with the brown pants acting more like a short capri on my long legs. It was days like this that I got to thinking of how grateful I was for the opportunity to stay in Vietnam for a little bit longer. I learned lots about my friends, and one of my favorite aspects of their culture is how open they are to strangers; how they just immediately let them in to their personal lives, and are completely honest. It is something that I miss the most. And lastly, as I don’t want to write a novel here, I have to talk about my experiences with the nurses at the second hospital that I worked in. The first week as usual was slightly stressful with not much sense of direction, but I quickly made friends, and their generosity was incredible. My days consisted of learning from doctors for a few hours, walking from room to room, checking patients vitals, or just practicing Vietnamese. But as soon as I took a break in the nurses “lounge”, I was bombarded with different Vietnamese foods coming my way. Each nurse wanted to share with me a piece of their dish, and talk to me as much as they could. Each morning from there on I would be asked in Vietnamese “Ali an sang chua?”, a phrase meaning “have you eaten breakfast yet?” Per usual I had not, and my answer encouraged them to start making me a coffee, and once again piling different foods in my bowls and encouraging me to eat mysterious shaped foods. My response that the food was delicious, or “ngon”, only encouraged them more. This routine continued until the end of my internship. The goodbyes were not easy, and there were many I had to make. Each attempted goodbye always ended with another attempt by them to try and meet up once more, at which I sullenly had to refuse. There are only a few things I will say to end this review that went much too long. These moments that I experienced were granted to me due to my opportunity to take up an internship with ABROADER, who set me up in the select hospitals, with my host family, and opened the doors for me to make connections. And of course when you take on an internship you have to do your part. You must be open, able to laugh when things don’t go your way, and not let any roadblock deter you. Looking back I know that I have changed. While I couldn’t see it in the moment, the internship boosted my confidence and improved my relationship with failure. It also made my more open with myself and those that I met. I wished my internship could go longer, and perhaps I will find a job in Vietnam one day, so for now all I can do is reminisce through reviews about the most life-changing time I had with my internship and with ABROADER.

Alison Burelbach

Medical Internship ,Loyola University Chicago, USA

Everyone from the program coordinator to my local buddy was extremely supportive! The experience would not have been as great as it has been if I was by myself. I felt very satisfied with the service ABROADER Vietnam provided for my Nursing Internship in Vietnam at Ho Chi Minh Hopspital of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation. I was clear about the rules and expectations required of me during my placement. My supervisors instructed me and helped me with language translation and clarifications of responsibilities. With their help, I felt I was well equipped for the job I was assigned. I brought my equipment from home to the workplace and it provided great assistance for my work. During the internship in Vietnam, I was glad I was able to learn technical skills from the nurses from the hospital. They have all been very supportive, friendly, patient and open to my help. They trained me with techniques quite different from how it is occasionally done back home. I will definitely recommend this program to my colleagues!

Sandra Gomez Vega

Nursing Internship ,University of Texas Austin, USA

The most satisfying aspect about my internship in Vietnam was my local buddy and my host family. They have always been very nice and inviting during my stay there. My host organization in Vietnam was a local school that provides courses and after-school activities to children with special needs. My co-workers were very generous with inviting me to after work activities or even a couple of days in Sa Pa. My supervisor cared about me both professionally and as a person. I hope that my work at the host organization helped the teachers with my insights working with children with special needs. I also hope to have opened the eyes of the students I worked with that there are people out there who understand their needs and can help them overcome their difficulties in their lives.

Sabrina Zottoli

Social Work and Community Development Internship ,Molloy College, USA

The 5 months spent in Vietnam was not only enjoyable but also felt enriching. I have become many times more independent than before and thoroughly enjoyed working at Vinmec General International Hospital- A conducive and enjoyable workplace for those interested in a career in Healthcare.

Skye Lee

Healthcare & Pharmacy Internship ,Republic Polytechnic, Singapore

Working for the Cham Island MPA was a really good fit for me, I think they picked a good job. I also liked my city tour I had fun, and got to do so many things! Vietnamese people are very nice and the living environment is safe when I hang out with my Vietnamese local buddies. I also get lots of support from local buddies and become real friends in spite of different interests.

Isabella Taylor Sullivan

Environment Internship ,Portland State University, USA

I had an amazing experience with ABROADER Vietnam. They organized me a great internship placement and took very well care of me. I am so happy I chose this organization for my internship abroad. I loved the feeling of having people around that support me and that they were checking in regularly on me, organizing events, etc. It felt a little like family with which you can share every little problem, your experiences, etc. and I think that is the strongest and best part about ABROADER. Overall, I had a great experience with ABROADER Vietnam and I can only recommend it to others!

Selda Nur

Water Pollution Internship ,University of Zurich, Switzerland

I think my experience is different from others. I think many people who joined the internship say something like ‘I find what I wanna do in the future’ or ‘I find discover myself.’ But for me, I cannot find my future job. I cannot say working at hotel is my future job. Before I go to Vietnam, I really wanted to work at hotel or be something it cherishes the hospitality such as a flight attendant. I thought I’m really open minded and it is best job for me. After finishing the internship, I thought the job at hotel is really nice job, to do best for the people all the time like I thought once but now I cannot say I wanna work at hotel in the future with 100% sure. It’s because I feel stressful when I receive the bad service as a customer. More and more I polish my service, I’m really dissatisfied with the service of others. So now I wanna put a distance from the service job. So now, I’m looking for what I wanna do in the future in Japan and challenges many things. But this is what I can say with 100% sure It was best decision to take the internship in Vietnam. It is because thanks to the challenge of internship in Vietnam, I became to love challenges much more than the time before going to Vietnam. Before going to Vietnam, I had a fear to challenge. But now, I challenge many things and I realize my life is really full one! And I wanna recommend this internship to other Japanese students of course. You may be able to find your future job and yourself or not, no matter how different you feel about internship after finishing it, I can say with 100% sure it will be worthwhile to your life in some way.

Keiko Kaji

Hospitality Internship ,Tokyo Woman`s Christian University, Japan