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Program Fee

Below are our base program fees and dates. Please check with our Program Coordinator for more specific details on the costs and before you make any travel arrangements to Vietnam.

PROGRAM FEES

The total fee for a full internship program with ABROADER is assessed depending on the length of your internship and is shown as below:

Duration (weeks)04*06*081012162024
Full Service $2,327 $2,684 $3,410 $3,786 $4,125 $4,840 $5,555 $6,270
No Housing $1,777 $1,859 $2,410 $2,518 $2,625 $2,840 $3,055 $3,270

If you only seek for an internship placement in Vietnam, the program fee is set to be $700 USD/placement and does not depend on the length of your internship either

*4-6 week options are only open for medical/nursing and education/teaching internships. For business, engineering, or other office-based positions, if you need less than 8 weeks, we need to verify with potential host company first, but this is not encouraged and we cannot guarantee placement.

Fees are higher than previous years because of an increase in housing costs (1.5 times higher) and the government has changed visa laws, so visa arrangement prices have increased as well.

WHAT IS COVERED?

Besides matching you with the best employer for your desired internship placement, our programs also include many special components to assist you in settling down in Vietnam and make sure you have an excellent overall experience with your internship.

Those special components are packaged in one toolkit and are basically everything you need to get settled in Vietnam:

  • Internship placement
  • Visa application (single-entry 3 month business visa, 1 month for 4 weeks)
  • Airport transfer (pick-up & see-off)
  • Local volunteer support
  • Accommodation (homestay/private or shared apartment which is fully-furnished)
  • Pre-departure check & on-site orientations
  • City tour
  • Local SIM card
  • Cultural excursion to top destinations in Vietnam (Ha Long Bay or Mekong Delta)
  • Cooking day
  • 24/7 support
  • On-going internship evaluation
  • Welcome & farewell dinners
  • Certification upon completion of the progra
  • Pre-application screening

WHAT IS NOT COVERED?

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Visa stamping fee
  • ealth insurance
  • Local transportation allowance
  • Daily meals and other personal expenses
Overall we would say it was very positive. The immediate feedback and replies especially when she first arrived were so appreciated. I loved the Facebook posts and it made us feel a little closer to the experience there, especially when Monica was in the village and her internet was sporadic. Of course the village experience was exactly what Monica was hoping for, experience with children in another culture, living with a host family and having the support of mentors and people taking care of her, including taking her to the school each day. The excursion adventures were also amazing experiences for her and she was eager to participate in as much of exploring the Vietnamese countryside and culture as she could in her limited time.

LINDA ZANG

Education Internship ,Monica Anderson’s mother

Prior to arriving in Vietnam, I had never had a so-called “life-changing” experience. There is no guidebook on how to achieve one, nor was I able to grasp such a concept, moments so strong as to change the path for your life. That is until I went to Vietnam. There is so much more than meets the eye in the beautiful country of Vietnam. A tourist or temporary visitor may only be granted with picturesque views of rice fields and the women in their hats, the mountains of the north, or a steaming bowl of Pho placed on their plastic red table. And while these experiences are all incredible in their own right, there is so much more to discover, whether it be the story of the people under the hats, the sellers on the streets, or the history of the land that you have the opportunity to travel. ABROADER Vietnam granted me the opportunity to uncover such stories, and an internship with memories that has left me longing to go back since the moment I returned home. Vietnam has become my second home. Granted, I had gotten the opportunity to travel and become accustomed to Vietnam for about four months prior to starting the internship. My University had allowed me to study abroad during which time I adjusted to the food and language, learning about almost every aspect of Vietnam culture. But this was only a preview of what was to come. My time with the internship let me interact with the people, practice my Vietnamese, take trips with my coworkers, and uncover passions for things I didn’t know existed. I have too many incredible stories to be able to write them all throughout this review, and so I’ll pick a few of the mostly little interactions that really meant the most. ABROADER Vietnam set me up in a homestay, perhaps one of the highlights of my journey, and I can say with complete honesty that I felt like part of the family. There was a cook by the name of “Vui”, meaning happy in Vietnamese, and how appropriate as she radiated happiness onto me throughout my entire stay. She did not speak any English, but somehow I was able to coordinate trips to the market, request my favorite food for dinners, and convey to her how much I loved her country. She bought me 21 roses on my 21st birthday, only proving her kindness. The mother of the household, unlike Vui, spoke some English. She often taught me Vietnamese when I had free time, as well as took me to the market, and made me feel extremely welcome when I felt the slightest bit homesick. But as for the internship itself, I was placed in two hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, one directly in the center, and one located more on the outskirts. I’m not going to lie and say that there were no challenges. Originally people were confused to why I was there, I got lost several times, and some days I had no one to teach me, but those were a minuscule few days as most, out of a ten week internship. I made friends with the doctors who taught me about topics from infectious diseases in Vietnam, to the catheder lab, and even more in the surgical urology department.. We frequently went out to eat, where we exchanged stories, and I answered curious questions about my time in Vietnam thus far. Other friends I made were medical students, originally too shy to approach me, but through my time in the hospital gathered up the courage to speak to me. I served to help them practice their English and was happy about it as I know how many opportunities it can open up for them. They invited me for bubble tea, food, and even once to a Vietnamese fruit farm, two hours by train. I was gifted the opportunity to dress up in the MOST attractive brown cloth attire, and proceed to pick and eat as much fruit as humanly possible on perhaps one of the most humid days. While I felt almost at home, eating to my hearts desire, I most certainly looked out of place with the brown pants acting more like a short capri on my long legs. It was days like this that I got to thinking of how grateful I was for the opportunity to stay in Vietnam for a little bit longer. I learned lots about my friends, and one of my favorite aspects of their culture is how open they are to strangers; how they just immediately let them in to their personal lives, and are completely honest. It is something that I miss the most. And lastly, as I don’t want to write a novel here, I have to talk about my experiences with the nurses at the second hospital that I worked in. The first week as usual was slightly stressful with not much sense of direction, but I quickly made friends, and their generosity was incredible. My days consisted of learning from doctors for a few hours, walking from room to room, checking patients vitals, or just practicing Vietnamese. But as soon as I took a break in the nurses “lounge”, I was bombarded with different Vietnamese foods coming my way. Each nurse wanted to share with me a piece of their dish, and talk to me as much as they could. Each morning from there on I would be asked in Vietnamese “Ali an sang chua?”, a phrase meaning “have you eaten breakfast yet?” Per usual I had not, and my answer encouraged them to start making me a coffee, and once again piling different foods in my bowls and encouraging me to eat mysterious shaped foods. My response that the food was delicious, or “ngon”, only encouraged them more. This routine continued until the end of my internship. The goodbyes were not easy, and there were many I had to make. Each attempted goodbye always ended with another attempt by them to try and meet up once more, at which I sullenly had to refuse. There are only a few things I will say to end this review that went much too long. These moments that I experienced were granted to me due to my opportunity to take up an internship with ABROADER, who set me up in the select hospitals, with my host family, and opened the doors for me to make connections. And of course when you take on an internship you have to do your part. You must be open, able to laugh when things don’t go your way, and not let any roadblock deter you. Looking back I know that I have changed. While I couldn’t see it in the moment, the internship boosted my confidence and improved my relationship with failure. It also made my more open with myself and those that I met. I wished my internship could go longer, and perhaps I will find a job in Vietnam one day, so for now all I can do is reminisce through reviews about the most life-changing time I had with my internship and with ABROADER.

ALISON BURELBACH

Medical Internship ,Loyola University Chicago

Before the internship in Vietnam, I have always been interested in being a teacher of Japanese and this internship has made me realize how hard it can be teaching someone my own language but also how fun it can be. For anyone who are not used to working in groups, this program pushes you to, a lot of times, with your students, with your fellow interns and with your supervisor. No matter how much I fear working with a group, I realized, through my internship in Vietnam, that teamwork is key to success and you would be surprised how much opening your mind and listening to people’s opinions can get you far.

YUMI KANEYAMA

Education Internship ,Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University, Japan

I had an amazing experience with ABROADER Vietnam. They organized me a great internship placement and took very well care of me. I am so happy I chose this organization for my internship abroad. I loved the feeling of having people around that support me and that they were checking in regularly on me, organizing events, etc. It felt a little like family with which you can share every little problem, your experiences, etc. and I think that is the strongest and best part about ABROADER. Overall, I had a great experience with ABROADER Vietnam and I can only recommend it to others!

SELDA NUR

Water Pollution Internship ,University of Zurich, Switzerland

The level of support provided from ABROADER Vietnam was great, and I loved the activities where everyone was involved, including the local buddies!

MEGAN BERNARD

Education Internship ,Monash University

My internship in Vietnam with ABROADER was a life changing experience. I was a marketing intern at a travel company in Hanoi and now work for the same company as a full time employee. Being in Vietnam has taught me so much about different people and cultures, as there are many other foreigners working here as well from all over the world. My internship coordinator at ABROADER was so helpful, and was a huge support for me whenever I needed it. I would definitely recommend ABROADER if you are looking to do an internship here. They really cater to your needs and care about what you want and are looking for.

LILLIAN SARAH GRANT

Marketing & Communication Specialist Intern ,University of Massachusetts Amherst, U.S.A

All in all, to say I learn a lot is an understatement. I’ve gained precious insights and experience into the development process by getting the opportunity to work with an industry-leading company. I’ve improved my technical skills in JavaScript and updated my skills to the latest technologies. For future interns working for here, I advise that you come with open arms and the willingness to learn. You should be open to making new friends and learning new things, and I assure you that you will have a great time here just like I had. If I could redo my experience, I would’ve taken the opportunity to make friends outside of my circle. To socialize with more people here in Vietnam. I would also love to immerse myself more in the Vietnamese culture and explore Vietnam more, experiencing new food and places.

Muhammad Zaidi Bin Noraidi

IT Internship ,Republic Polytechnics Singapore

I did my internship in Chemizol/Culligan Water Vietnam under the supervision and guidance of Chris, who is a very nice person and always cares about me. I feel pretty satisfied with my internship journey as it increased my self confidence and my ability to cope with unfamiliar situations. It also further developed my interpersonal communication skills when working with co-colleagues. Besides that, my internship in Vietnam has expanded my curiosity of the world and at the same time gained a greater understanding of my home cultural identity. I wish I could have more time to go to different factories so that I could contact customers and analyze samples. Overall, my 6-week internship is so great!

Bin Zhou (Ryan)

Internship at Chemizol/Culligan Water Vietnam ,University of Queensland

The most satisfying aspect about my internship in Vietnam was my local buddy and my host family. They have always been very nice and inviting during my stay there. My host organization in Vietnam was a local school that provides courses and after-school activities to children with special needs. My co-workers were very generous with inviting me to after work activities or even a couple of days in Sa Pa. My supervisor cared about me both professionally and as a person. I hope that my work at the host organization helped the teachers with my insights working with children with special needs. I also hope to have opened the eyes of the students I worked with that there are people out there who understand their needs and can help them overcome their difficulties in their lives.

SABRINA ZOTTOLI

Social Work and Community Development Internship ,Molloy College, U.S.A

It was an overall enjoyable experience having my internship done through ABROADER Vietnam. The host company that they connected me with has been welcoming, friendly, I have been able to experience a lot of different elements of the company’s culture, helping different people and learning new things about not only the company but also working in general. I felt that I contributed to the host company and my particular help with the MWRP (checking English) was of great importance to them as the deadline approached. They have given me feedback and said that some of my research into potential donors and other youth initiatives in climate change adaptation has been of use to them too. Regarding ABROADER Vietnam intern service was my placement and the amazing support from local staff and volunteer in Hanoi. Would I recommend the internship to anyone interested, definitely!

MAARTEN VAN BALEN

Environmental Engineering Internship ,University of Edinburgh, Scotland